The Provisional House

Understanding the Angry Gamer

askagamedev:

One thing I’ve noticed is that, within the gaming community, there are always the really angry gamers. Extremely vocal gamers who are vehemently angry with a developer about things. It is usually because of some design decision or implementation about the game that just rubbed some of the players the wrong way. And boy, do gamers love to hold grudges.

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If you work on games, you too will probably see them at some point. Hopefully you won’t have to deal with them directly - that’s what community management is for. But it always helps to understand your player base, because it helps to translate the things they say into actual useful feedback.

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There has been a lot of stress in my life over the past few years, but booting up Skyrim and exploring the tundra for a little while always helps me calm down.

Thank you for your contribution to the TESblr Positivity Project!

I’ve always felt this way about Skyrim and Morrowind, but, having loaded up Oblivion recently, I found that it too makes me feel this way, despite how much I’ve criticized some of its decisions. Maybe it’s the Live Another Life idea, or the fact that my TES life is, at this point, like a comfortable worn-in sweater, but the games never fail to make me feel good.  View Larger

tesblr:

There has been a lot of stress in my life over the past few years, but booting up Skyrim and exploring the tundra for a little while always helps me calm down.

Thank you for your contribution to the TESblr Positivity Project!

I’ve always felt this way about Skyrim and Morrowind, but, having loaded up Oblivion recently, I found that it too makes me feel this way, despite how much I’ve criticized some of its decisions. Maybe it’s the Live Another Life idea, or the fact that my TES life is, at this point, like a comfortable worn-in sweater, but the games never fail to make me feel good. 


Daily Tamriel and Why I Do It

With the current iteration of the project being over two months old, I figured it was high time I explained myself, both for all the new followers (thanks, guys!) and for anyone with questions.

Who are you? 

I’m Lady Nerevar! You should call me Lady N, though, cause “Lady Nerevar” is cumbersome and I came up with it when I was 13. You can also call me Darya, if you’re so inclined. 

I’m a 23 year-old, full-time, in-house Concept Artist at a mobile game company. I’m also a huge Elder Scrolls nerd (as if you can’t tell).

What is Daily Tamriel?

Daily Tamriel is a project where I attempt to make something new and Elder Scrolls related each and every day. This is usually some kind of art thing, since I’m an artist. I originally had the idea back in 2011, when I did a month of daily drawings leading up to Skyrim’s release. I also did a short run of Daily Tamriel right after I joined Tumblr. 

Why do you do it?

The really awesome thing about my job is that I get to make art for video games all day every day. The really shitty part of my job is that I don’t get to show or talk about anything I’m doing. This gets especially shitty when I’m working 12 hours on a Saturday on something that exactly 5 people will ever see. It gets kind of demoralizing to know that a year of your creative output can’t be shared with people. 

So I decided to make something for myself every day. Even if it’s not very good, or good at all. Even if I did it in five minutes and hate it. At least it’s out there, and I made it. Who knows, maybe someone will see something in it? 

Why Tamriel?

See ibid.: huge Elder Scrolls nerd. There’s always something there to inspire me, whether it’s a whole new design, or some fan art, or a map.

But, Lady N, you’re always complaining about how busy you are!

Yes, yes I am. I’ve got all my “hobby” jobs, like updating and improving the Imperial Library or helping to fact check Shoddycast. I’m perpetually in the middle of half a dozen emails or private messages (sorry, everyone to whom this applies). Sometimes I’ll skip a day or two in Daily Tamriel, either because I’m too busy with everything else or because I’m entirely arted-out for the day. But, generally, taking 5-20 minutes to draw something for myself helps to keep me happy and sane. 

Can I do it too?

Of course! Take it and run with it. Use it as a writing, or a cooking, or a costuming challenge instead of an art one. Make it longer and weekly. I’m no gatekeeper. 


I’ve been seeing a lot of really good pixel art lately, so I went ahead and made a little gif. 

I’ve been seeing a lot of really good pixel art lately, so I went ahead and made a little gif. 


browborn:

"By contrast, the Eastern people of Cyrodiil relish in garish costumes, bizarre tapestries, tattoos, brandings, and elaborate ceremony. Closer to the wellspring of civilization, they are more given to philosophy and the evolution of ancient traditions. The Nibenese find the numinous in everything around them, and their different cults are too numerous to mention (the most famous are the Cult of the Ancestor-Moth, the Cult of Heroes, the Cult of Tiber Septim, and the Cult of Emperor Zero). […] Above them are the merchant-nobility, the temple priests and cult leaders, and the age-old aristocracy of the battlemages. The Emperor watches over them all from the towers of the Imperial City, as dragons circle overhead." 

"The traditional Nordic pantheon of Eight Divines was replaced by a baroque veneration of ancestor spirits and god-animals, practices encouraged by the mutable-yet-monotheistic doctrines of the Alessian faith. The doctrines eventually codified nearly every aspect of Eastern culture. Restrictions against certain kinds of meat-eating, coupled with the sentiments of the blossoming animal cults, soon made agriculture and husbandry nearly impossible. Thus, many of the Eastern Cyrodiils were forced to become merchants, which, over time, allowed the Nibenay Valley to become the wealthiest city-state in the region." — First Pocket Guide to the Empire, Cyrodiil

Nibenese tattooing and branding is complex and esoteric. Rooted in the ancestor worship and veneration of god-animals (and some Imperials scholars say even before that, before the Nords and before the Ayleids), it has waxed and waned in popularity in the Empire, whose opinion ranges from ‘primitive’ (Colovians, mostly, and ignorant foreigners like the Thalmor) to ‘sacred’.

Unlike Western Cyrodiil, where tattooing was seen akin to more permanent warpaint, Eastern Cyrodiil held to its tradition of sacred tattooing and branding with a dragon-clawed grip.  To ink and etch one’s body with the secret knowledge of the gods, both new and old, was seen as a hard but noble road, a life-time commitment to the veneration of one’s chosen deities. It is for this reason that the majority of Nibenese tattooing and branding artists are priests, and, as everything religious in the Niben Bay, precepts and rituals must be performed before being tattooed and branded.

Nibenese cults guard their sacred motifs, seals and prayers zealously. A person cannot simply walk into a temple and demand to be tattooed and/or branded, as it is considered a major offense for it is a callous treatment of what is seen as a contract with the gods. Only the most devout are willing to subject themselves to the pain of hours, days and months of tattooing and/or branding. Many cults demand that those willing to undergo the rituals do so in complete silence, for it is a time for meditation.

Due to their sanctity not much is known about the properties of such tattoos and brandings, though those who are ‘magic-sensitive’ claim to detect faint traces of magicka emanating from them. As a matter of fact, many tattoos and brands have much in common with magickal seals such as runes, and some even use languages applied in magickal studies.

Those who are tattooed and branded in the Nibenese tradition are expected not to flaunt them, for it is a private contract between oneself and the gods. Common opinion in Cyrodiil is that Colovians tattoo themselves to intimidate (like their Nordic cousins), while the Nibenese tattoo (and brand) themselves to venerate their gods through soul, mind and body.

Nibenese tattooing and branding is currently underground, as many of the motifs and designs venerate deities such as Tiber Septim the Mortal, Talos the God and Akatosh, both as Himself and as his Avatar, Martin Septim.


Something I’m working on in between everything else I’m working on.
This is intended to be a replacement of the ubiquitous Arthmodeus map of Tamriel, and to be the most complete map to date. It incorporates maps from ESO and Skyrim, in combination with those from each of the games, filling in the areas that remain uncovered with the PGE3 maps and the Redguard map of western Tamriel. 
It’s also absolutely colossal - 24x18 inches at 300dpi. So… posters, maybe?  View Larger

Something I’m working on in between everything else I’m working on.

This is intended to be a replacement of the ubiquitous Arthmodeus map of Tamriel, and to be the most complete map to date. It incorporates maps from ESO and Skyrim, in combination with those from each of the games, filling in the areas that remain uncovered with the PGE3 maps and the Redguard map of western Tamriel. 

It’s also absolutely colossal - 24x18 inches at 300dpi. So… posters, maybe? 


Creation Kitten →

Are you a modder? Do you want to be a modder? Does technical talk get you hot? 

If any/all of those are true, you should follow the Creation Kitten tumblr, which is is already looking like a great place for TES modding advice. 

(I am in no way affiliated with the blog. I just think that some of you would appreciate it.)


Echmer, designed by and drawn for IceFireWarden. The Echmer are a bat-like race inhabiting the islands of Yneslea, which lie between Tamriel and Akavir. You can read more about them here

I apparently forgot how to draw necks when it came time to ink, so I went ahead and included the sketch (which kind of looks better anyway).